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37LC Phantom 1 Restoration Project 2020 - by Nick Clark (Page 4 of 5)
Slowly but surely 37LC is coming together nicely. The body tub now secure and rear wings fitted. Spare wheels are now mounted in the recess of the petrol tank, which incidentally was made from scratch by Michael and to redeem what would have been lost gallon wise he made the tank broader at the front to compensate for the loss, and what a perfect job he made.
As with many restorations there's a lot of waiting for parts and other jobs that have been farmed out, so I thought with time on my hands I should fit the dash and do the wiring. Correct cotton braided wiring was ordered and delivered together with the correct ross courtney connectors. If any member has tried to re-wire a P1 then you know how tricky it is. the first couple of wires inserted into the conduit (in the chassis rails) are no problem but then when you are up to the sixth you start with the problems, TOO TIGHT! After a bit of patience and tugging it all came together. The back lights were fitted with double filament bulbs so we have stoplights incorporated in the side lights for safety.
Dash board fitted with all instruments and wired accordingly. Battery fitted next and with a flick of the switch we had ignition, rear lights and stoplights, so far so good!
Nickel plating arrived after a ten week wait due to lock down, so the gear and handbrake levers are now assembled.
I have been asked the question by a few members "how did the new cylinder block perform on warm up", going back to my first report, I mentioned Michael had made a Monoblock from scratch to replace the original 2 blocks, one of which was damaged. The answer is "it performed perfectly". It was brought up to temp' (75 degrees) three times and after cooling down the block was bone dry. After three days the water level was at the correct level and the engine oil was as clear as day installed. A few members (including myself) were worried the block would not expand and contract at the correct rate which would result in leaks.
Michael's workshop at his home was full of every tool and machine possible. His large milling machine which he used to mill out all the steel for the new block was very impressive as was his ability to manufacture this very delicate piece of the engine. His engineering skills were second to none and far beyond many including myself.
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